Wednesday, July 9, 2008

Beating that Horse a Little More...

I had to remove the original posting here... seems the author of the article (or a friend of the author it seems) is using the "copyright" bit to stop commentary. Oh well...

However, their comment on my combox is NOT copyrighted, so let's see what they had to say:

My emphasis and comments

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I fail to understand why music in the Catholic Church must have such a narrow definition (such as...?). Our own God is infinite and yet you are saying there is no room for other forms of expression beyond chant and scholas (I did not say that, nor do I believe that). If you attend liturgies in other places such as South America or Africa, you would find a completely different form of expression (true... however they may well be in error as well. Liturgical abuses are not restricted to the U.S.A). Nowhere does it say that artists must be so constricted in their creativity to worship a God that is far bigger than anyone can imagine.(Umm..Tra le Solicitudini, Musicae Sacrae, Sacrosanctum Concilium, Musica Sacra, Liturgiam Authenticam, Sacramentum Caritatis.. as well as numerous writing by our current Holy Father.)

I personally love chant. I've been a member of choirs over the years. I know that the Vatican prefers chant most especially for the liturgy. But we aren't at liturgy 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We are out in the world most of the time and it's hard sometimes to stay connected to our God with all the distractions the world provides (precisely... so placing our faith within the context of such distraction is the answer?). Popular forms of music are a wonderful way to stay connected to our faith and even feed it and share it with others (I would strongly disagree). It's something you can take with you in your car, your mp3 player, or it can just play in your head. I could go on and on how much my faith life has been fed by contemporary music with lyrics about the Catholic faith. (and it has shaped your faith into a particular form)

I have to say that I personally know the writer of the article you printed on your blog. He works tirelessly and donates so much time to this effort of promoting Catholic (pop) music. He has a very large family and a responsible job at a university and yet finds the time to work with Critical Mass, and work with people such as those involved with the Eucharistic Congress. Critical Mass is an excellent band and has inspired many young people to worship our Lord (but it has inspired them to worship HOW... ?). It is too bad that the committee could not work a little harder to find a place to them to play at the Congress.

You mention why Critical Mass didn't suggest themselves directly as band to perform. If you are offering to help someone promote an event, don't you think it's a little crass to promote your own band in the process? (not at all... most of the bands there would have done so in an instant) It was obvious that Critical Mass was a viable choice and the committee was well aware of their work. I think the committee could have done better by them.

Also, please note that this story was reprinted on your blog without our permission (and has been removed... my apologies). There is a copyright at the bottom of this and all stories that requires that you email the editor for permission to post a story before doing so:

© Copyright 2008 GrapeVine. Permission to copy or reprint this story must be obtained by writing to susan@gvonline.net. Used by permission.

Since the story was already here, I figured I might as well comment on it. (thanks).

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So there we have it. Yes, of course I understand that this was not intended to be in the context of Mass, although certainly MC Marini's role in organizing the Eucharistic Congress certainly wouldn't rule that OUT! The point I was making, that was sorta sidestepped in this comment, was that there is a disjunct between the message of Catholicism and the medium of Rock Music. I wish I had said it first, but Pope Benedict XVI beat me to the punch in "Liturgy and Church Music". His analysis of why the medium of Rock Music is incompatible not only with Catholic worship, but with the entire message of the Catholic faith should be read by any and all "Catholic Rockers" who truly believe that what they are doing is inspired by the Holy Spirit. The conclusion is that, well, not all spirits that inspire are holy.

If you, the commentor, are reading this, I would urge you to click on the above link and read what he has to say about what you are doing. The problem is, obedience is perhaps the most trying of virtues.




8 comments:

GrapeVine - your one-stop connection to Catholic Music. said...

I fail to understand why music in the Catholic Church must have such a narrow definition. Our own God is infinite and yet you are saying there is no room for other forms of expression beyond chant and scholas. If you attend liturgies in other places such as South America or Africa, you would find a completely different form of expression. Nowhere does it say that artists must be so constricted in their creativity to worship a God that is far bigger than anyone can imagine.

I personally love chant. I've been a member of choirs over the years. I know that the Vatican prefers chant most especially for the liturgy. But we aren't at liturgy 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We are out in the world most of the time and it's hard sometimes to stay connected to our God with all the distractions the world provides. Popular forms of music are a wonderful way to stay connected to our faith and even feed it and share it with others. It's something you can take with you in your car, your mp3 player, or it can just play in your head. I could go on and on how much my faith life has been fed by contemporary music with lyrics about the Catholic faith.

I have to say that I personally know the writer of the article you printed on your blog. He works tirelessly and donates so much time to this effort of promoting Catholic music. He has a very large family and a responsible job at a university and yet finds the time to work with Critical Mass, and work with people such as those involved with the Eucharistic Congress. Critical Mass is an excellent band and has inspired many young people to worship our Lord. It is too bad that the committee could not work a little harder to find a place to them to play at the Congress.

You mention why Critical Mass didn't suggest themselves directly as band to perform. If you are offering to help someone promote an event, don't you think it's a little crass to promote your own band in the process? It was obvious that Critical Mass was a viable choice and the committee was well aware of their work. I think the committee could have done better by them.

Also, please note that this story was reprinted on your blog without our permission. There is a copyright at the bottom of this and all stories that requires that you email the editor for permission to post a story before doing so:

© Copyright 2008 GrapeVine. Permission to copy or reprint this story must be obtained by writing to susan@gvonline.net. Used by permission.

Since the story was already here, I figured I might as well comment on it.

Dad29 said...

I fail to understand why music in the Catholic Church must have such a narrow definition. Our own God is infinite and yet you are saying there is no room for other forms of expression beyond chant and scholas

Let us make distinctions.

Music for the Mass has been defined, countless times, as that which 1) glorifies God and 2) lifts the minds and the hearts of the faithful to God. It must be beautiful, universal, and holy.

That simply eliminates rock music, as well as any OTHER music which does not elevate the MIND to God.

You seem to agree with that.

As to "rock" music in general--Chironomo is absolutely correct, and he could have cited Cdl. Jos. Ratzinger if he wanted to. Not only is rock wrong for Mass--it is also the antithesis of Christianity. Bottom line is that rock's back-beat motivates only that which lies under the beltline.

I'm sure you understand that.

As to your more general line--that 'an Infinite God' can be worshipped with a variety of styles...

Maybe--except that very same Infinite God appointed Peter to regulate such things.

Sacred time, sacred space, sacred language, sacred music. All of a piece.

Chironomo said...

Dad...

Glad you got to comment before I had to take the posting down... and thank you for your comments as well... you may notice that I did cite exactly what you were thinking, "Liturgy and Church Music".

Charles said...

Dear Chironomo, Grapevine and Friends,
Could someone explain to me, like I was a three year old, how the copyright rule applies in the blogosphere when one is repeating quoted remarks within a copyrighted article?

GrapeVine - your one-stop connection to Catholic Music. said...

It is simply a means to try to discourage people from taking articles without permission. I have no problem with articles being quoted, but when full articles are lifted and then comments are inserted (especially comments which I consider to be hurtful to the person whom the article is about), I have a problem with that. I feel a certain responsibility towards the person in the article to protect them, if I can, from that sort of thing.

Charles said...

Thank you, Grapevine, for your concern. But I still don't know much more about the specifics that would answer my question. I've known Dan since 1978 personally, have accompanied he and the SLJ's since. I don't think he requires protection from healthy dialogue about the most serious actions and feelings we humans can express, namely worship. I can understand your interest in protecting the viability of your vested interests in him and elsewhere.
Now, can he be quoted and those comments deliberated or not? Thanks.

GrapeVine - your one-stop connection to Catholic Music. said...

You're perfectly welcome to quote from the article as long as the conversation is civil and constructive. I don't want my article to be used in any way to attack Mr. Schutte. I'm not saying that your blog is necessarily this way, but I've seen too many blogs on this subject that are downright vitriolic. I would hate to think that my article would in any way add to that kind of discussion.

There were some comments on my blog about this article that were excellent. They reflected the point of view you reflect, and were very respectful. I learned a lot from them and I hope the person who wrote them will write some more. If you want to see what we were talking about, check out the comments section of the article. Maybe you can even continue that discussion over here because I did have some questions I'd love to have answered.

Charles said...

Thank you, Grapevine. I'm all for charity, much less civility.